Pillsbury Doughboy Obituary

It is with the saddest heart that I have to pass on the following:

RIP Pillsbury Doughboy
The Late, Great Pillsbury Doughboy

The Pillsbury Doughboy died Monday of a severe yeast infection and complications from repeated pokes to the belly.

He was 71.

Doughboy was buried in a lightly greased coffin.

Dozens of celebrities turned out, including Mrs. Butterworth, the California Raisins, Hungry Jack, Betty Crocker, the Hostess Twinkies, and Captain Crunch.

The graveside was piled high with flours as longtime friend Aunt Jemima delivered the eulogy, describing Doughboy as a man who “Never knew how much he was kneaded.”

Doughboy rose quickly in show business, but his later life was filled with many turnovers.

He was not considered a very smart cookie, wasting much of his dough on half-baked schemes.

Despite being a little flaky at times, even as a crusty old man, he was considered a roll model for millions.

Toward the end it was thought he’d rise once again, but he was no tart.

Doughboy is survived by his wife, Play Dough.

They have two children, and one in the oven. The funeral was held at 3:50 for about 20 minutes.

Where Bumper Cars Go On The Streets of California Legally

Street-Legal bumper cars as made in California by a Tom Wright, dedicated fan.

black-beauty bumper car mighty-orange bumper car bumper car as a station wagon red and black bumper car grey and black classic bumper car flaming yellow bumper car

It’s easy for a gear-head to be discouraged about the state of the world, especially in times of Carpocalypse and Cash for Clunkers.

But occasionally a bright light of awesome renews the spirit. Road-legal bumper cars do just that. Yes, you read that right; these little beasties are street legal.

They run on either Kawasaki or Honda motorcycle engines and co-opt vintage bumper car bodies into the most awesome form of mini-car we’ve seen in too long. There are seven of these little monsters floating around California , and they’re all the creation of one man, Tom Wright , a builder in the outskirts of San Diego who figured the leftovers of the Long Beach Pike amusement park needed a more dignified end than the trash heap.

They were originally powered by Harley motors but they rattled like hell and Tom replaces them with Honda or Kawasaki 750’s and a couple have been measured as capable of 160 MPH , which is terrifyingly fast in machines with such a short wheelbase.

bumper car interior